Background on Jude

Author Since first verse identifies the author as Jude, we must ask ourselves who Jude is. The name is a derivative of the Judas, which is the Greek form of the Hebrew name Judah. Unfortunately, Judas was a tremendously common name during the first century. In fact, two of Jesus’ twelve disciples were named Judas—Judas …

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Introduction to Jude

The Epistle of Jude is a rather neglected book. Likely due to an assortment of factors (such as its brevity and citation of apocryphal sources), this poetic letter has often been under-utilized within the church. Though I do not claim this to always have been so throughout church history, personal experience has largely left me …

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Heart to Heart

Background on Jonah

Author Anonymous, possibly Jonah himself. Though there is some debate that Ezra (or some other post-exilic author) scribed this account. The evidence is simply too scant to take a decisive position; therefore, all suggestions are the best estimations of scholars.             Theme God will have mercy and compassion on whomever He pleases. Background Jonah is …

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Heart to Heart

Introduction to Jonah

These sermons were originally preached in 2015. We could assign many titles to a study through the book of Jonah. The Reluctant Prophet would be fitting since Jonah was just that. Perhaps The Compassion of God would be more suited, considering the fact that the great love of God is on full display throughout the …

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Reflecting on 500 Blog Posts

Writers write. Tim Challies wrote that article in 2017, and being, at that point, two years into blogging, it was just the kind of bluntness that I needed. The standard for being a writer is writing, not being read. How revolutionary! This realization shifted the emphasis away from things that I cannot control onto things …

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What Role Does Tradition Play in Theology?

After citing Isaiah against the Pharisees, Jesus added this rebuke: You have a fine way of rejecting the commandment of God in order to establish your tradition! For Moses said, ‘Honor your father and your mother’; and, ‘Whoever reviles father or mother must surely die.’ But you say, ‘If a man tells his father or …

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The Secular Utopia Is Not Coming… But Jesus Is!

A few weeks back, I watched a fascinating video discussing dissent from Darwinism. Towards the end, Stephen Meyer (who was one of the three being interviewed) made a comment about the importance of three men’s ideas upon the modern-day Western world. Darwin, Freud, and Marx together laid the groundwork for a secular worldview detached from …

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Can Women Be Deacons?

This article was originally a part of my sermon over the qualifications of deacons from the series, Biblical Leadership. Their wives likewise must be dignified, not slanderers, but sober-minded, faithful in all things. 1 Timothy 3:11 ESV This verse is less controversial than 1 Timothy 2:12, but there seems to be more interpretational disagreement within …

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Two Sermons on the Resurrection

Happy Resurrection Day one and all! If you'd like to further meditate upon Jesus being risen, here are two sermons for you. From The Apostles' Creed, this sermon over the Resurrection of Christ describes why it is our trustworthy, living, and eternal hope. From Philippians, this sermon describes the glorious blessing of knowing Christ and …

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Communion, Coronavirus, & the Songs of Ascents

Tomorrow is the first Sunday of the month and for my church that typically means observing the Lord’s Supper. The ordinance of Communion, in which we eat and drink of a very physical bread and cup in remembrance of the broken body and shed blood of Jesus for our redemption and our continual need of …

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